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1930s Floral Blouse and Sporty Shorts

1930s Floral Blouse and Sporty Shorts

It’s not a secret I love the 1930s, and my usual daily uniform consists of a buttoned vintage-style blouse, high-waisted pants, and a cardigan. I originally purchased the Wearing History 1930s Day or Evening pattern intending to make solid-colored, long-sleeved, long-peplumed blouse for a fall outfit, but decided to start with the short-sleeved, short-peplumed version.

The fabric I used is a Liberty of London print that was a holiday gift. It’s a modern print with flowers and strawberries but I thought suited the 1930s pattern very well. The green buttons, chartreuse grosgrain ribbon, and white buckle were all vintage.

I did modify the pattern to allow for buttons since that’s my favorite style of blouse. The original pattern has 2 closure options for the center front: a hidden placket with snaps, or button loops and buttons. This means if you use the pattern as-is, your right and left fronts will meet in the center. If you decide to modify the pattern to have buttonholes, you need to take account adding enough ease in your fabric to allow for the overlap. You don’t need to change any other pattern pieces. Please also note that if you like the center bow in the stock images, using the pattern as-is may be a better choice.

My shoes are from American Duchess. The hat is an 18th century straw bergere that I trimmed with flowers and ribbon. The purse is a crocheted 1930s reproduction.

Another small modification I made was to take the shoulders in slightly. This is not an issue with how the pattern is drafted; I have narrow shoulders so that is a change I normally make for many patterns. The other consideration is that strong shoulders are historically appropriate for 1930s and 1940s blouses, but can be overwhelming on my smaller frame. I cut out the blouse and sleeves as directed, but at the attachment point I took a larger seam allowance in the upper half of the armscye. This allows for a slight reduction in both the bodice and sleeve without the need to redraft.

I paired this blouse with a some sporty shorts I made out of a white pique fabric. I made the shorts with the same pattern hack I used to make my plaid shorts: I used the upper portion of the pants of the Decades of Style 1930s Last Resort Beach PJs pattern I used for my own set then added a waistband.

There is an invisible zipper down the center back seam and a hook and bar at the waistband. The bottoms are finished with simple turned up hems.

I’m happy to add this 1930s blouse to my wardrobe and to recommend this pattern!

Upcycling a 1990s Dress into an 1890s Blouse

I recently completed a steampunk-flavored, not quite historically accurate, but oh my I love stripes 1890s/1900s-inspired blouse by upcycling an unflattering 1990s dress into a wearable blouse. (It time-traveled 100 years back!)IMG_5696

The original dress had an elastic waist, zipper back, pencil skirt, and puffy three-quarter sleeves. I cut off the skirt and used the sleeves to make new sleeves.IMG_5699

I made a waistband and buttoned back using scraps from the dress. I made button loops instead of button holes because I couldn’t overlap the back panels because of the pre-existing sailor collar.IMG_5708

Here’s a look at the original dress:

The original was so frumpy!IMG_E5469

I have some navy blue wool that I plan to use with the Black Snail Edwardian Bicycle Skirt pattern.il_570xN.1057503348_1n8f

I’ve used some scraps from the dress to make covered buttons for the skirt.IMG_5691

With different accessories I plan to use this with a Victorian bicycling outfit and a Wild West event for next year. I hope this will be a versatile blouse!IMG_5712.JPG

Wearing History Dahlia 1940s Gathered Blouse

This post is way overdue, because I made this 1940s-style blouse in August and have been enjoying it ever since! It was made using the Wearing History Dahlia 1940s Gathered Blouse pattern, with some modifications I’ll detail below.IMG_3702

This blouse is made with vintage cotton I found at the Costume College Bargain Basement. There was just enough, with careful cutting, for me to make this blouse and run the border of the print down the center front and as faux cuffs on the sleeves.IMG_3703

I used a combination of View A and B because I wanted the V-neck of View A but the button front of View B. (This also means instead of having the side closure of View A, I put hooks and eyes down the center of the peplum).

The blouse pattern doesn’t actually have a yoke. I just did a tuck in the back to hide a flaw in the fabric. I also did a neck facing instead of binding.IMG_3699

I did keep the lovely gathers in the shoulder! That is one of my favorite parts of the pattern.IMG_3701

I made button loops and self-covered buttons for the closure.IMG_3697

The last change I did was to shorten and slim the sleeves a bit because I have a small frame and skinny arms. I think the sleeve pattern as-is would work for most people; it is accurate to the slightly boxy look of the 1940s.IMG_3665

My modifications were for personal preference and not because of any flaw in the pattern. I found that the sizing was accurate and the pieces fit together. I highly recommend Wearing History and the Dahlia 1940s Gathered Blouse pattern!