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Monthly Archives: January 2018

Steamtorium Undercorset Belt and Teacup Holster (Steampunk Project and Pattern Review)

My most recent project is a steampunk utility belt with swivel hooks that accessories can be attached to: a teacup holster, a pouch, a fan pocket, and some skirt lifters/chatelaines. These items were made with two patterns from the Steamtorium Etsy shop: the under corset belt (which includes the pouch, fan pocket, and chatelaines) and the teacup holster.IMG_6440

And here it is without the teacup and fan.IMG_6442

Although this was designed to be a steampunk accessory, which would probably work quite well for a Wild West event I have this year, I think it would make a great sewing utility belt too!  I might wear this to a workshop some time. The fan pocket can be used for scissors, various tools can be clipped to the chatelaines, the pouch would hold small items, and I have to stay properly hydrated while sewing, of course. =) My favorite item is the teacup holster!IMG_6411

There’s a pocket for your saucer, a pocket with a secure snap strap for your cup, a pocket in the back for teabags, and some loops on the side for your spoon.IMG_6410

My first thought when I got these PDF patterns was “Wow! Step-by-step instructions clearly illustrated by color photographs!” The pattern is not a difficult one, but has a lot of steps and small parts, so the pictures help a lot, especially if you are a visual learner.

The belt pattern is multi-sized for 27-45″ waists, and the fan pocket comes in 2 sizes, while the rest of the accessories come in one size. Here’s some more examples made by the pattern-maker:

All the accessories are detachable and can be moved around because of a swivel hook and D-ring system.IMG_6429.JPG

You can wear this at your waist or hips.IMG_6439

Tips for easier sewing:

  • Don’t use a fabric that’s too thick! I used a heavy upholstery because I liked the pattern, but some of the straps are narrow and very difficult to turn if your fabric is thick. If I made this again I would use a lighter brocade or twill.
  • Read all the instructions carefully first before cutting out the pattern pieces. I ended up cutting some extra pieces that weren’t needed. (For example, if you make the teacup holster to be worn with this belt, and not your own, you will make small D-ring straps, instead of big loops, but both kinds of attachments are provided).
  • The pattern instructs you to sew ribbons to each end of the belt to tie it together. If you want to be able to swap the ribbons whenever you like, you can put eyelets or grommets into the ends, like I did. (This is the only change I made to the pattern).
  • Get sewing clips. Some parts of the project requiring sandwiching together many layers of fabric, and it’s much easier to clip them together instead of pinning.IMG_6352.JPG

Pros and cons:

  • Great, detailed instructions!
  • There are a lot of pieces. This not a difficult pattern, but it can be time-consuming. Don’t do this the night before a convention! I would recommend pinning the pattern to each fabric piece you cut out so you can keep track of all the small pieces.
  • Related to above, there are a lot of materials, and give yourself time to source all of them. In addition to your fabric you will need swivel hooks, D-rings, O-rings, foam batting, fleece batting, interfacing, ribbon, and thread. There’s a detailed materials list in the pattern.
  • The belt is made of 6 pieces of fabric (3 on the front and 3 on the back). I suspect this is so that the pattern pieces can fit on an 8 x 11″ paper, and so you can save some fabric yardage. However, if you have thick fabric you will have bulky seams, and it’s hard to match patterns. I think having an option to tape the paper pattern together to make one larger pattern piece to cut the belt out would be nice.
  • Very responsive customer service! I found a small typos/omissions on some pattern pieces, but Sherry, the pattern designer, said she would fix them right away. I think by the time you read this review the version in her Etsy shop should have all the updates!

Project cost: I normally provide a tally of the costs, but it’s a little hard in this case because a lot of the items are from my stash, or you use small pieces of it (like the foam interfacing),  and some of the hardware is sold in a large pack. (For example, you only need 1 snap, and it comes in a pack of 10). I’d estimate that if you were to buy everything from scratch it may cost $30-40 depending on the fabric and the type of hardware, and you would still have a lot of materials left over.

Final thoughts: This was a fun project to make, the patterns are good with clear instructions, and I recommend them!

Note: I was offered this pattern for free by Sherry Ramaila of Steamtorium, but I wasn’t paid for this post. All opinions are mine, and I used my own fabric. Thank you Sherry for the pattern!

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2018 Costuming Plans

I know I have 3 other projects I should blog about before talking about new ones (sorry, so behind!), but it seems appropriate to follow up my 2017 costuming year in review post with 2018 costuming plans.

My big project for the year is Vice Admiral Amilyn Holdo, a character from The Last Jedi. I love the draping of her gown and I’m really excited for this costume!IMG_6163

Plus she has some cool space jewelry like a halo, arm cuffs, earrings, and rings.amilyn-holdo

I’d like to get this done for Silicon Valley Comic Con, and also wear it to Costume College.

My other projects are planned around various events, mostly hosted in the Bay Area:

  1. February: 18th century gown for a gathering to see the “Casanova: The Seduction of Europe” exhibit at the Legion of Honor Museum. I may make a new wig and accessories for an old dress, or make a new outfit from scratch. Let’s see how much time I have!
  2. March: Regency day dress for a themed event at a winery.
  3. April: Amilyn Holdo costume for Silicon Valley Comic Con.
  4. April: Wild West outfit for a train ride/BBQ event. I’ll be wearing my steampunk striped blouse with a bicycling skirt and some other things in progress.
  5. June: 14th century cotehardie for a Viking/medieval/fantasy picnic.
  6. July: Costume College prep! Various new underpinnings, accessories, fixes, finishing touches, etc. for the things I will wear. Plus SECRETS!
  7. October: Bustle or natural form evening gown for dinner party on a riverboat. I might upcycle an older outfit, like my Gibson Girls dress, which has only had one outing because that’s what a sane person would do. Unless I see something shiny.
  8. October: 1950s Halloween dress for a mid-century potluck party.
  9. December: 1830s day dress for Dickens Fair. I have made an 1830s evening dress before, but I have been wanting a day dress for a long time!

Hmm, written out that looks a little crazy. Luckily, some of these will involve patterns, shapes, or eras I’ve worked with before. I also have the main fabric already for every single item on the list except one. Thanks stash!

2017 Costuming Year in Review

Looking back, 2017 was a busy sewing year!

My biggest project was my Napoleonic court dress, train, and diadem, worn at Costume College. I spent much of the first part of the year working on it.IMG_3396-(ZF-3567-92908-1-002)

My 1660s Cavalier gown was also a big project. I made a bodice, skirt, chemise, bum roll, and jewelry. I’d like to revisit this to fix a few minor issues, or possibly retrim it with metallic lace.IMG_4216-(ZF-7662-83598-1-001)

I also made an 18th century plaid dress and wool petticoat for an Outlander-themed dinner party in May. Although the dress and fabrics are simple, I found it very flattering because of the fit (and the giant bum pad!)IMG_2037

I made some 1930s beach pajamas, which were really fun! I’d like to make another one in a nice print some day.IMG_4445

Although I technically finished my Tudor kirtle and smock last year, I didn’t get a chance to wear it until this year.IMG_4336

I also made a Crimson Peak-inspired ensemble for a spooky Victorian Halloween tea party. There are a few little more things I want to do with this costume before it’s really “done” and I take some better photos.IMG_4696

I made a 1940s blouse using a Wearing History pattern, and started some other vintage projects that I haven’t posted about yet.IMG_3702

I up cycled a 1990s dress into a steampunk 1890s blouse, and I’m in the process of making a matching skirt!IMG_5696

My final project of 2017 is a lace 1920s dress, plus a silk slip to go with it, that I made right before New Year’s. I haven’t blogged about it yet, and didn’t do any progress posts because it was a quick project! I have a post planned with a pattern and tutorial for both the slip and the dress, so stay tuned!IMG_5929.JPG

Wow, when I list everything out it was a busier year than I thought! I already have plenty of ideas and events planned for 2018. Happy New Year everyone!