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Tag Archives: 1910s

1910s Edwardian Wool Suit

I love the Edwardian era and the Wearing History 1910s WWI suit pattern seemed smart and cozy. 

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I liked the big lapels, sailor collar, and tulip-shaped pockets and cuffs.

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I used a gray and black houndstooth wool for the skirt and accents and a yellow wool for the jacket. The black buttons are vintage Czech glass buttons and the the yellow ones are vintage handmade.

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There are different options for collars and pockets in this pattern.

The skirt is made according to the construction methods of the era where there’s an internal waistband that actually holds the skirt up. The waistband you see on the outside is attached at the top but not at the bottom, allowing for the gathers in the back of the skirt to hang loosely. 

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I made myself a matching hat which was pretty easy! The base of the hat used the same pattern as the jacket belt. I wrapped it around my head at a jaunty angle and pinned it to fit. The center of the hat is just a giant pleated rosette with a pompom hiding the center hole.

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I’m afraid I took my photos while it was getting dark quickly during winter, so they are a bit grainy.

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Some sizing notes: This is based on an antique pattern from the period.

  • The original skirt is quite long (great for tall people) but WH includes a cutting line if you want a shorter version of the skirt. I am 5’6″ and cut the shorter version.
  • The shoulders of the jacket are rather broad. I had to take in the shoulders a little bit to reduce the width.
  • The jacket is very full and loose but this is intentional. Shaping is done by the belt. You do not need to cut a smaller size; it is supposed to be a bit tent-like. (For security I have some hidden snaps in the jacket and hooks and bars in the belt).

Materials:

  • 3 yards gray/black houndstooth wool: $31.50 plus tax and shipping from Fabricmartfabrics
  • Pattern from Wearing History: $28 plus tax and shipping
  • 4 yards yellow wool: $65 including tax and shipping from a FB destash group
  • Vintage yellow buttons: $6 + tax from a marketplace
  • Vintage Czech glass buttons: from eBay; I’ve had them for years and don’t remember how much I paid
  • Thread, snaps, etc. from stash

I’m not quite sure of the total cost because items 1 and 2 had shipping bundled with other items; I don’t have receipts for everything, and I have leftover wool in both colors, but I hope this gives you an approximate idea of what it will cost you to make your own. Thank you for reading!

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Plaid Galore (Using American Duchess Cape and Wearing History Blouse Patterns)

Earlier this year I made a mauve wool 1910s wrap cape using the free pattern from the American Duchess Patreon.   I’m happy to see so many other people making it! The cape even has its own Instagram hashtag #ADcapecult.SXFB6622

I lined the cape with a blue and black plaid fabric I got from a friend but constructed my cape in a way to make it reversible. LEYY6663

The cape is inspired by an antique cream and black one.IMG_7297

I made mine using a light-weight wool for spring/fall usage.IMG_7486

One of the cute details this cape has is the contrast on the collar, which I repeated on the lining to make it fully reversible. QLWZ6538

This cape pattern is available in PDF format but is a gridded pattern you have to scale up. To save time I just printed the pattern extra large and taped the pieces together. IMG_7402

The closures are hidden under the back of the cape. The front pieces wrap around and you can finish them either by with hooks and bars or a ribbon bow. I had to trim a little bit off the ends because of my body shape. If you are large-busted you may need to change the size of the darts on the front wraps.

Overall, it’s an easy, good-looking cape and I plan to use this pattern again for a witchy wardrobe!IMG_0007

I had plenty of the plaid fabric left over and used it to make this cute 1930s double-breasted blouse pattern from Wearing History. IMG_6938JERR7630RRXR6541

I’ve coordinated the house in the outfit above with the Daphne retro wedge sandals from American Duchess.

Like all the other Wearing History blouse patterns I made, I am quite happy with how this turned out. It is not a complicated pattern because there are not many pieces. There’s some leeway to adjust the fit by moving the buttons and buttonholes a bit.IMG_6927

The shoulders have a split which make for a cute detail. Plus there’s a belt in the back with a buckle.SLWP7455

I loved the way this blouse looked with the red cigarette pants, but I had enough fabric left over I decided it would be also fun to make matching shorts. This way I would have the look of a romper but the convenience of a 2-piece outfit. IMG_0098

To make the shorts I hacked an existing pattern I already had: the Decades of Style 1930s Last Resort Beach PJs. I used the upper portion of the pants because I wanted the high-waisted look. You can see the beach PJs I made in an earlier post.

I had fun making my little mini capsule wardrobe!

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