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Regency Pelisse

I have finished my navy Regency pelisse that goes with my bonnet.

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There are no progress shots to share since sometimes I worked on this for literally a few minutes here and there over the past year. Sometimes all I had time to do was sew on a hook and eye.

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The fabric is a jacquard woven with a subtle diamond pattern. I’m not sure of the fiber content since I found it as a remnant. I’m sure it’s at least partially synthetic, but I liked the texture.

The lining is gold and cream jacquard, and the sleeves are lined with satin. The coat is military-inspired, with cream braid down the front, on the belt and sleeves cuffs, and around the edges of the pointed collar. The front and back are decorated with gold-colored and faux pearl buttons, but the coat closes with hooks and eyes. The belt has a golden buckle.

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I used the Sense and Sensibility “Regency Spencer Jacket and Pelisse Pattern” as a starting point, but made new sleeves and collar. (A quick note about this pattern: I was disappointed to find it is not actually a pelisse pattern, although it is advertised as such. It is really a spencer jacket pattern only, with some instructions telling you to just add a skirt to lengthen it. Although that wasn’t terribly difficult to do, when I buy a pattern it is because I want to pay someone else to do the math).

The pelisse has some wrinkles to work out, but overall I am pretty pleased with it, and plan to wear it to Costume College.

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I still have to paint some shoes to match, but I think it will look nice with the bonnet.

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Project cost (not including bonnet materials):

- 3 yards fabric: $29.99 + tax

- pattern: $12 + $3 shipping

- 8 yards braid: $7.60 + tax

lining, interfacing, buttons, thread, hooks and eyes: from the stash

Less than $60. Not bad.

The Hopeless Romantics Invade Gaskell Ball, 1830s Style!

There were so many beautifully made gowns at Gaskell Ball. Most of us used the same pattern, but I loved all the variations in fabric choice and trimming.

We made a lovely rainbow!

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And had a ton of fun!

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Here I am with the other pale-colored ladies.

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Kim had such a cute doll-like shorter dress.

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Natalie of Frolicking Frocks looked just like a fashion plate.

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Breana of Mothball Fleet had such a daring and darling color combination, with perfect piping.

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Elizabeth had a bodice with impressive detailing, and a padded hem.

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Amanda’s dress looked great in motion.

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Samantha had such a cute bow sash.

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Jean-Anne went for a bold print that worked out great.

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Jenny looked elegant in white.

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Christina of The Laced Angel used an old sari, to great effect.

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Kathy of Stuff I Sew had an impressively smocked dress. Read the details here!

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Monica had charming little fans and tucks on her dress.

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Kaila had really lovely piping and pleats.

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Cassandra’s dress reminded me of a Disney princess.

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You’ve seen mine, so here’s a silly photo.

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I am looking forward to next year’s theme!

1830s Romantic Dress (Part 6): Finished Dress and Hair

Last night I had a fantastic time dressing up with a large group of other ladies wearing Romantic Era gowns (and crazy 1830s hair) at the Gaskell Ball in Oakland, CA. (I will be posting photos of everyone in my next entry!) I finished my dress with a few days to spare, but did not have time to work on the hair until the last day.

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(I didn’t have time to make a new petticoat, and the old one is a little longer and less poofy than I would like, but that is a project for next time).

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I was very pleased with the way the sheer sleeves came out. I was fretting before about how to pattern them, then went for the easiest approach. I took a yard of fabric, sliced it down the middle, French seamed the pieces to make 2 tubes, and gathered the ends into the armhole or wrist openings.

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The bodice is pleated and embellished with pink and green embroidered lace and little pink ribbon flowers with pearls in the centers. The back of the neckline is also pleated.

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The cuffs are made with the same embroidered lace I have on the bodice neckline. The waist is trimmed with a green scrap of fabric (leftover from a Titanic, and then Gatsby project). The pearl and rhinestone buckle was purchased from Britex.

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The hem is trimmed with embroidered tulle lace, as you previously saw.

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I struggled with the hair, and it is a little sloppier than I wanted, but I think it’s a decent first try. A  number of people asked me if it was my real hair!

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I forgot to buy a foam head, so I used a stuffed toy monkey. I bought a long black wig, and split it into 3 sections. I made 2 fat braids and pinned them into Princess Leia-style cinnamon buns.

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The middle section was braided and left for the moment.

I then used another large piece of fake hair that I split into 2 braids (with wire braided in). I formed pretzel loops and sewed that to the wig, and then used the little braid from the main wig to wrap around the base. I pinned a fake peony in the back, and put some little roses and butterflies into the buns.

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I decorated the front with a little fake bird, a birdcage and some feathers.

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I had a lot of fun with this project!

Final cost rundown (not including fake hair):

Silk taffeta, linen lining, hook-and-eye tape, bird, feathers, flowers, cage: from the stash

Tulle lace: $27.96

Floral lace $11.91

Organza: $3.10

Pearl buckle $9.73

Total $52.70*

*well, I did spend about $200 on silk a few years back, but we’re talking new expenses here. =)

1830s Romantic Dress (Part 5): Bodice

I haven’t done a lot of sewing in the past few weeks because I started work again and have had some long hours. However, here is a sneak peek at the bodice in progress.

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I put on the puff sleeves and started the sheer ones. The neckline has lace. I still need to fuss with the fitting (since the heavy sleeves are pulling things down), the gathers and the cuffs on the sheer sleeves.  The front will be embellished with some little pink flowers.

Bloglovin

You can ignore this post (or you can follow me!) I have a Bloglovin account, and needed to “claim” my blog by making a post with a little bit of code in it.

Also, there is now a little box in the upper right corner where you can enter your email and subscribe to new posts. (If you have a WordPress account you can still hit the Follow button).

 

1830s Romantic Dress (Part 4): Waistlines and Hemlines

I have hemmed the skirt from floor-length to ankle-length to make it more like the fashion plates of the day. Plus, it will be easier to walk and dance in! I also ruffled 2 rows of the embroidered tulle lace and sewed it around the bottom, using 12 out of the 20 yards I purchased.  Here is a sneak peek at the hem.

IMG_1801I tried on my overbust corset, and although it fits just fine, the pressure on my chest is rather uncomfortable since I’m still nursing. Currently I’m trying to decide between wearing an underbust corset as a foundation, or just making the dress to be worn sans corset to be extra comfortable.

However, I am sure that the waistline of the bodice needs to be raised considerably. The TV455 pattern is very long-waisted, even if you did not want the high-waisted look of the late 1820s or early 1830s. This is a picture of the bodice in progress, after I already cut off several inches of fabric all along the bottom. I still need to shorten it more. The bodice looks rather baggy because it is still missing darts, and is also larger than my dress form.

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I am using hook-and-eye tape for the back closure, reinforced by some plastic boning.

 

 

Tea Menu

Today I typed up a list of teas I have, to avoid this common conversation with visitors:

“What sort of tea would you like to drink?”
“What do you have?”
“Lots. What kind do you like?”
“I don’t know. What do you have?”
(Starts recital. Visitor panics and picks the first one they recognize).

Now I can hand over a list.

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The list is printed on 5×7 paper from a notepad I bought at Michael’s.

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